Development

As a human who appreciates good design, art and techniques, I am always looking for new challenges, aesthetics and ideas. With inspiration bound to pop up anywhere and potentially everywhere, it's important to keep up with the times. Even if that includes education and giving the E! website a rest.

I'm not referring to professors, student loans or frat parties, although it wouldn't be too much of a curse to experience that all over again, sans the student loans. Just keeping your technique, abilities and mind updated is enough of a challenge. Look at a design. How would you create it? Can you create it? These are questions I constantly ask myself, in the hopes of a personal education, if you will. You hit a roadblock, Google it, ask a fellow designer, hell, trial and error. Just get it done. The satisfaction of learning and doing will make you want to scream it on top of a mountain.

One area that seems more blank than most in my crazy Catie brain, however, has always been web design. Sure, I've taken beginner classes. But, it's a scary, daunting, hanging-over-my-head cloud that I can't seem to shake. Especially since I hear the internet is popular and stuff. But, nonetheless, it took some real life wisdom to ground me. 

Advice from a design friend relaxed my nerves and dried the sweat from my brow on this subject. You don't have to be a web developer to design websites. In fact, many graphic designers fall into this category. It doesn't hurt to know the basics, which any web development 101-esque class can teach you. Or, a website I stumbled upon, Silkshare. [You can enroll in these classes for around $20, learn some things and make some great connections.] This way, your basic knowledge will inform you of specific constraints and ways to work cohesively with web developers. 

So, my new personal project, even though it's totally career related and not all that personal, is to work on web design. A few books in the library of Catie won't hurt, but I'm ready to go. 

Not on web development, but my own development.

Party on, Wayne.

 

Today's inspiration brought to you by Andy Titus and Oxide Design Co., Omaha Nebraska.